A Constitutional History of Secession

$24.95

  • 449 Pages
  • Extensive Notes at Chapters’ End
  • For Further Reading and Research list of ‘Short Titles’

In this history of the legal practice of secession, Jh. Remington Graham proves that the need for a lawful and bloodless transfer of power is supported by natural law and is a building block of both    the British and American constitutions.
With the new Union of 1789 emphasizing that each State was a free, sovereign, and independent member of
the American Confederacy, citizens enjoyed the constitutional right to abolish or reform laws, or even to secede
from the Union.  Mr. Graham proves how the Southern States followed these procedures and enacted their legal rights.
This is an in-depth, scholarly and worthy read for students of history and republican government.

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Table of Contents
Preface: The theme of this work:--peaceable and lawful revolution...and ineradicable character of this right.
Ch.   I. The British Crown: The attributes of sovereign power...the principles of the Glorious Revolution stated by Blackstone.
Ch.  II. The American Union: The Charter of James I...the ominous prophecies of Patrick Henry.
Ch. III. The Northern Secessionists: The clauses in Article I, Section 8 on raising armies and calling forth the militia...peace restored with Great Britain and Canada.
Ch. IV. The Southern Abolitionists: The Great Compromise in the Philadelphia Convention...the difference in the relations between the races in the North and in the South.
Ch.  V. The Nullification Crisis: The school of strict construction...the compromise which saved the Union.
Ch. VI. The Missouri Compromise: The Treaty of Paris in 1783 as a conveyance of western lands to several States in the Union...Lincoln's error: railroads and money, not slave power.
Ch. VII. The Southern Confederacy: The deathbed prophecy of John Calhoun...Lincoln's lawlessness as president in order to "save the Union"...[actions by sovereign States].
Ch.VIII. The War Between The States: [non-factors of the North in determining the outcome of the war...certain battles and Generals...the last years of Jefferson Davis.
Ch. IX. The Reconstruction Acts: Lincoln's murder/evidence of a conspiracy behind Booth...[post-war Amendments]..."the Federative System between neighboring Free Democratic States."
Epilogue: The fall of Atlanta...[relations between British North America and the United States, 1867]...the just observations of Lord Acton on the right of secession.
Table of Short Titles

Table of Contents
Preface: The theme of this work:–peaceable and lawful revolution…and ineradicable character of this right.
Ch.   I. The British Crown: The attributes of sovereign power…the principles of the Glorious Revolution stated by Blackstone.
Ch.  II. The American Union: The Charter of James I…the ominous prophecies of Patrick Henry.
Ch. III. The Northern Secessionists: The clauses in Article I, Section 8 on raising armies and calling forth the militia…peace restored with Great Britain and Canada.
Ch. IV. The Southern Abolitionists: The Great Compromise in the Philadelphia Convention…the difference in the relations between the races in the North and in the South.
Ch.  V. The Nullification Crisis: The school of strict construction…the compromise which saved the Union.
Ch. VI. The Missouri Compromise: The Treaty of Paris in 1783 as a conveyance of western lands to several States in the Union…Lincoln’s error: railroads and money, not slave power.
Ch. VII. The Southern Confederacy: The deathbed prophecy of John Calhoun…Lincoln’s lawlessness as president in order to “save the Union”…[actions by sovereign States].
Ch.VIII. The War Between The States: [non-factors of the North in determining the outcome of the war…certain battles and Generals…the last years of Jefferson Davis.
Ch. IX. The Reconstruction Acts: Lincoln’s murder/evidence of a conspiracy behind Booth…[post-war Amendments]…”the Federative System between neighboring Free Democratic States.”
Epilogue: The fall of Atlanta…[relations between British North America and the United States, 1867]…the just observations of Lord Acton on the right of secession.
Table of Short Titles